How Would You Have Stayed in Touch With Friends and Family in The 19th Century?

How Would You Have Stayed in Touch With Friends and Family in The 19th Century?
How Would You Have Stayed in Touch With Friends and Family in The 19th Century?

Imagine life without mobile phones and Facebook, without emails or coffee shops for the usual hangouts. Then imagine you don’t have the car, there’s no taxi or subway system. Really appalling, right?

Then think: your good friends are living in the next state and your family is on the other side of the continent. How do you stay in touch? What would be your mode of communication?

We’re so bound by technology today that relationships are kept alive by SMS, status updates, shout outs and tweets. People give their loved ones an account of interesting events through video blogs or a lengthy email, attached with randomly taken photographs. Even expressions of love and all other emotions now come in icons!

We have come to an age where the human aspect of relationships – touch, handwritten notes and mails, hugs and real flowers and chocolates – aren’t the norm.

I wasn’t so bothered about this until I sent my college friend a birthday card, with a short letter thanking her for those wonderful times, the stuff she gave me and did for me. I wrote it myself, erasures and maybe some misspelled words and all. She called up me, in tears, saying how touched she was that I remembered and took the effort to express something like that.

It was what got me thinking: have we really been ruled by gadgets and social networking sites that we cannot express love, affection and friendship the “old way”?

From then on, I’ve managed to set aside time and writing pads to make sure the people I hold dear would know they are truly special to me. I wanted to stay offline but in touch, I opted to reach out instead of being “cannot be reached”.

What about you? How would you connect with the people you love without technology?

Please share your ideas in the comment section below!

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